Monday, May 8, 2017

MAY 8, 1945 GERMANY DEFEATED!

Congratulations to our boys in Europe who have completed the destruction of Hitler and the Nazi menace.  Today is a day to celebrate that victory, but we must not forget the war is only half over as Tojo and his Imperial forces fight on in the Pacific.  As heavy as the increased war traffic has been on the North Bay Lines, we can expect it to get even heavier as our victorious forces pivot to Asia to bring their American steel into the battle against Japan. 



The management and employees of the North Bay Lines are expanding our physical plant to handle the additional traffic and continue to provide the highest level of service to our boys deploying through Camp Stoneman and the San Francisco Port of Embarkation.  


Two dictators down, one to go!

John Barry

ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 

Lovettsville, VA

Monday, May 30, 2016

A Visit to the National Archives

A great deal of information pertinent to my modeling efforts is preserved in the National Archives in College Park Maryland.  The Archives are a pleasant place to do research, but it does take a bit of preparation.


Archives II, College Park, MD

Some of the finding aids are available on-line, but most of the more useful aids are only available in the research rooms.  You need to have a current researcher card to gain access to the research floors, so plan ahead to spend some extra time on you first day checking in and getting registered.  Textual, photographic and cartographic records are on separate floors, so if you need to access all three, plan on a multi-day visit.  And although you can look at records on most Saturdays, you have to have them “pulled” during the work week, so weekend only visits are only good for figuring out what you want to look at when you can come back during the week.  If you are going to look at military files, as I have been doing, get familiar with the Army and Navy file plans for your time frame, available on line.  And they did change how they organized things over time, so reference to the contemporary master file plan really helps determine where to look. 

Don’t bring a hand-held scanner, you won’t be allowed to use it.  Do bring a good digital camera it makes a very good “DAD” (Data Acquisition Device).  I have been using my Canon 30D with a 28-135 lens on a tripod with remote shutter release.  You can hand hold, but that gets tiresome.  Ask me how I know.  Your newer smart phone can also work, as can your tablet.  I have copied the finding aid for the Office of the Chief of Transportation with my Kindle Fire.  I now have a copy that I can refer to while commuting. 

In my last visit on 27 and 28 May, I finally found some information on MAIN trains and Military Extras.  The MAIN train information came from formerly classified messages from the traffic control division of the Army’s Office of the Chief of Transportation, Record Group 336.  When working with any records, FOLLOW THE RULES!  This goes triple for formerly classified records.  Make sure that the declassification slip and the project number are visible in ALL copies and photos you make of any item that is in a record box that has ANY formerly classified records in it.  Most of the WWII records retain their original classification markings and were declassified in bulk.  Without the numbers from the slip, you will have a very hard time proving that the Secret document on your hard drive isn’t any more.  Having your hard drive confiscated is not something that you want to deal with. 

And here are a couple examples of what is there you can click to enlarge:



This message is addressed to the Commanding General (C.G) Ninth Service Command (CMD), Army Service Forces (ASF), Fort (FT) Douglas, Utah and to the San Francisco Port of Embarkation (SFPE), California
The above reads: Military impedimenta (IMPED) from Camp (CP) Gruber, OK to Oakland, CA SFPE 1 box car, to Emeryville, CA SFPE 15 flat cars.  Both routed via Missouri Pacific, Denver Rio Grande Western, Southern Pacific.  Leave (LV) to arrive (ARR) January 9th.  Freight Route Order Military (MI) 6061 code 1190

Here’s one that I’ll need for Camp Stoneman:



7 Officers, 195 Enlisted Men arriving Camp Stoneman, CA from Wilken, NC on 16 January.  Consist of NEC (Necessary) Tourist cars, 1 Baggage (BAG) and one Troop Kitchen (TC). Routed Southern, Frisco, Santa Fe!  How many Tourist cars were necessary?  Army policy was to not have two enlisted in an upper, so the capacity of a section was two EM in the lower and 1 in the upper.  With 195 enlisted, that meant at least 65 sections.  Officers usually travelled in standard Pullmans, but apparently not in this case.  They did not have to share a berth though, so a max of two per section for 4-7 more or 69 to 72 total sections for the troops in this move.  To that, each sleeper also carried its Pullman porter and I think each train also carried a Pullman conductor, but I am not certain.  To accommodate all the troops and the Pullman personnel, would take at least six 13 section tourist cars.  If Pullman were able to provide four 16 section cars plus another of any capacity, they could have reduced the number of cars by one.  This is a good modelable MAIN train for me with a baggage car, three 13s, Troop Kitchen, three more 13s.  Time to get cracking on building those Branchline 12-1s as 13s tourist cars with Tom Madden’s non-AC roofs.


JOHN BARRY
30 May, 2016

Arlington, VA

Memorial Day 2016

Remembering those who gave their all. 

I had the privilege today to be present at the 148th Memorial Ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery.  I have visited a couple times in the distant past, but today was the first time that I attended a formal Memorial Day Ceremony.  There was quite a line to get in through security, though it moved quickly. (TSA, you could learn something from the Secret Service and the Army) 
  
The gentleman behind me was complaining to his wife that the line was so long and that the uniformed service members were also waiting in the same line.  Maybe I should have shared my thoughts: “A long line for today’s ceremony means that the people care enough to honor those who did lay down their lives for our country.”  And “Our service men are citizens too.” 


And they kept coming, this view is just as I got to security, the line is no shorter than when I started.



Part of the Presidential security detail getting into position.

But it wasn’t just Americans who came to pay their respects today.  A group of Germans were not too far ahead of me in line and ended up across the aisle at the ceremony. 




And they too, rendered honors at the playing of Taps.



The VFW was well represented in the color parties.



I heard my first live 21 gun salute during the arrival of the official party.  All of the speakers spoke well and gave respectful honors to those who gave their lives for their country.



The invocation.



Retiring the colors.



After the ceremony I visited the Tomb of the Unknowns.

Exiting the amphitheater, I came across a pair of group headstones that have special meaning to me.  I learned of both sets of deaths on the flight deck of a C-130 while prepping for a training mission.  The first, in 1980, was the calamity at Desert One while attempting to rescue the hostages from Iran.  That event inspired me to volunteer for Special Ops flying.  I didn’t know any of the men involved personally, but they did have an impact on my career.



The second incident memorialized here really hit me in the gut.  I was prepping for my first flight in the C-130A at Wright-Patt when my instructor came out late and said the Space Shuttle just blew up.  Frank said it so nonchalantly; we all thought he was kidding to explain his tardiness.  Only after we returned from the flight and saw that endless loop of the video of the explosion, did the reality set in.  I lost two people that I did know.  The Commander, Dick Scobee, was the son of my Air Force Academy Liaison Officer.



Ellison Onizuka had taken time out of his schedule as an instructor at the USAF Test Pilot School in the summer of ’77 to teach a young cadet how to operate and program the HP calculators that they were using for data analysis. 



That young cadet was me.

Today was a moving day for me.  One where I recalled the memories of many comrades who are no longer with us like Tony, one of my loadmasters, killed in the LAPES demonstration crash of 1987 or my classmate, Gary, whose parents told him he couldn’t come home if he quit the Academy.  Gary went home in a box.  They live on in my memories as do the thousands of others living in the memories of their comrades, friends, and loved ones.

Never Forget.



John C. Barry, Major, USAF (Ret)

Saturday, April 9, 2016

Accurail’s new 36’ box car

Eric Hansmann has posted another installment of prototype information for Accurail’s forthcoming 36 foot box car kits on his Design, Build, Op blog. (http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/accurail-prototype-data/)
 Ray Breyer has done a great job again with a summary of prototypes for the 1400 series straight sill version with metal ends.  Ray gives some information as to how many cars of a given prototype survived at certain dates.  That is very helpful for determining how many of a given road name existed at that point in time.  But it doesn’t tell you about the rest of the fleet and how likely it would be to see any short box cars at that point.  My recent work on the January 1945 Official Railway Equipment Register (you can read about it here: http://northbaylines.blogspot.com/2016/03/building-wwii-atsf-fleet-vi-gilbert.html) gives a ready reference to how common the less than 40 foot car was.


Source: Jan 45 ORER

US XM less than 40':   57,917
NA XM less than 40': 119,727

Total US cars all types: 2,049,963          2.8%
Total North America:     2,236,560          5.4%

Total US Box, Auto & Vent:  742,117     7.8%
Total NA Box, Auto & Vent:  867,504   13.8%

Total US Box & Auto: 729,388                7.9%  
Total US Box & Auto: 845,775              14.0%

Total US Box: 614,603                            9.4%
Total NA Box: 735,724                          16.3%

The US fleet at the beginning of the last year of WWII was nearly 10% of the XM box cars registered in the ORER. 

The number of short auto cars was much lower, 1642 of 113,11 US auto cars, or 1.5%.

The total short XM and XA percentage was 8.2% of the US and 14.2% of the North American the Box and Auto fleet.  The percentage of short house cars should be larger also, but I don’t have a summary of ventilator car lengths, only the VA totals.  A significant portion was less than 40 feet though.

The pending K brake interchange ban, availability of steel for post war car construction, and the condition of a lot of these older, smaller capacity cars led to the rapid retirement of most of them in the period after WWII.  That said, a number of them soldiered on into the 60’s, so this is a very useful series of models to bring needed diversity to your transition era and earlier model fleets.


JOHN BARRY
Washington DC

9 April 2016

Saturday, April 2, 2016

Follow the Money

That old saw for finding out what really goes on applies to the railroad you are modeling too!

Santa Fe gross earnings for 1943

1        $94,493,000      Los Angeles Area
2        $81,550,000      San Francisco Bay Area
5        $22,231,665      McCune NM (Fort Wingate Ammunition Depot)
10      $17,738,121      Bellemont AZ (Ammunition Depot)

Two of the top ten revenue producers for 43 were isolated stations in the middle of no where on the Albuquerque Division.  Both stations moved up in the 44 rankings: McCune to 3rd with $29,561,035 and Bellemont to 9th with $23,414,024.  I don’t have the corresponding numbers for the metropolitan areas though.  The tariff for explosives and charges for dedicated trains must have been quite lucrative to boost these two locations into the top tier.

This partial information only whets my appetite to dig deeper into how the RR made its money and could afford all the cool locomotives and cars that we love to model.  Santa Fe, like its competitors, was in business to make money. You can see evidence of that in their internal histories with lots of ink devoted to revenue sources, traffic density, infrastructure improvements and growth potential. 

We have wonderful modeling resources in the form of conductor trip books, dispatcher train sheets and station records of trains.  But those are very hard to find because they only indirectly affected the revenue of the RR.  Those operations oriented documents may have provided source data for the accounting department, but the bean counters didn’t care that the NEX arrived in Stockton with 67 cars and departed with 59.  They cared that in 1943 at Stockton, ATSF originated 4616 carloads; terminated 9888; received 30,471 from WP, 19,514 from SP, and 1934 from CCT; forwarded 22,685 to WP, 14,799 to SP, and 362 to CCT along with how much revenue those cars made.

Perhaps a different line of inquiry to the various archives is in order.  One that pursues the financials and how the traffic paid off for the share holders and charged the public.  The good news is that some of this information was mandated by government to assist in setting rates and shows up in annual reports to the ICC and state regulators.  The railroads had to aggregate the data to compile the information in the reports.  The ICC reports had required information about commodities handled, the states got similar reports that included only data for their state.  That data had to be sortable to provide those state reports.  RR internal histories showed selected data by station.  What if we could find the accounting documents that were the basis for these summaries? 

Time for me to figure out which forms to look for.  Fortunately for me and my fellow Santa Fe modelers, ATSF was a very organized bureaucracy that wanted its employees to use the right paperwork and get the right form.  Two years ago I reached out to the Santa Fe community to find the form index.  Every bureaucratic organization needs one if they use forms.  And before computers and spreadsheets, paper forms were the way things got done.  Thanks to John Moore of Albuquerque who loaned me his 1947 and 1948 editions, I was able to scan them and provide them to the Santa Fe Historical and Modeling Society for the use of modelers and rail historians.  You can find the 1947 edition at http://www.atsfrr.com/resources/BarryJohn/47%20Form%201091%20Std%20Form%20Index.pdf
Someone else provided a 1927 edition. http://www.atsfrr.com/resources/Forms/1091%201927.pdf
And I recently found a 1975 edition that I purchased from eBay for our more modern modelers

These indices tell you the title and number of the form.  They are arranged by department, so you can find the report of locomotives assigned and cars repaired in the Mechanical Department section and the waybill and report of cars interchanged forms in the Accounting Department section.  Knowing what forms to look for helps your archivist or reference librarian find them by number or title.  Having the correct title helps, a lot.  Ask me how I know.

Other roads almost certainly have equivalent information.  If you model another road, work with your historical society to find and share this kind of information.  We all benefit from better access to information.

The bottom line is that what affected the RR’s bottom line is what got managed, recorded, and saved.  When you find your golden nuggets, please share them!

John Barry,
Washington DC

2 April 2016

Sunday, March 27, 2016

Building a WWII ATSF Fleet VI – Gilbert-Nelson results from the Jan 45 ORER



I have not written much of late and last touched this topic in June 2014 before I moved to DC.  You can see my five prior posts on the topic of building a representative WWII fleet at:
and I first wrote on this topic with an explanation of how I was setting the home road portion at:


A couple years back I obtained the CD copy of the Jan 45 edition of the ORER from Westerfield to supplement the Apr 43 and Oct 45 hard copies that I picked up in the 80’s.  The electronic edition has become my stick in the sand for what ran on US rails on my modeling era, right at the end of 1944.  The Apr 43 issue didn’t cover the war built cars and the Oct 45 included stuff that didn’t show up till after VJ day.  Having both hard copy editions made it possible for me to check a lot (and I do mean A LOT!) of things, but left me guessing and having to interpolate just a little too much.  I am an engineer, you know, and good data is golden!   

The CD consists of TIFF image scans of the individual pages, with the owner name as part of the file name.  This works well if you are working from you CD drive on a desk top computer, but I had grown used to the layout of the hard copies.  So I made a PDF shortly after I acquired it and ended up with a whopper of a single file, but one that I could use a lot easier on the laptop, Kindle and a portable drive for other computers.  I set it up to put the RRs in the front and the Private Owners in the back like the originals, but, as I discovered, the alphabetical scan names are not how the ORER is arranged.  It is somewhat easy to remember that ATSF is a lot closer to the front alphabetically than the Wyandotte.  It worked, but was clumsy.  I use the “Index of Railroads and Private Car Owners” in the hard copies to navigate the books, but there are three problems with using that method with the CD.  First, almost none of the scans includes the original page number, probably a limitation of the size of the scanner bed.  Second, the file names of the pages are keyed to the RR, not the original page, and some of the smaller roads that took up less than a page have separate scans to make the XYZ easier to find from your Windows file directory.  Third, the disk is not a complete ORER.  All of the roads that had cars are covered, at least I think they are as it is very comprehensive. But the front matter and the Editorial section at the end didn’t make the disk.  I grant that much of that info is ho-hum to most modelers, but some of it is useful to operators, like the recapitulation of box, auto and flat cars or the car service rules.  Also the List of Reporting Marks Assigned changed fairly often, so it would have been nice to have.  But I made due. 

After copying the ATSF data into an Excel spread sheet and expanding the entries to account for the ATSF classes by using the excellent ATSFRRH&MS reference books, I plodded along guessing what page Erie and Pennsy started on.  By the way, you Pennsy guys have it easy with the ORER as it lists your classes along with the number series.  Oh, I guess it makes it easier for us non-Pennsy guys to get it right too.  Or not, I bought a Sunshine X26C in December 2014 that if I’d checked a little closer, would have discovered it was built AFTER my era before I bid.  Oh well . . . Back to the matter at hand.  I decided an index was a good idea for my PDF conglomeration.  Before I left California in the summer of 2014, I obtained a copy of the index pages from the California State Railroad Museum (CSRM) Library.  I wish I’d thought to grab the List of Reporting Marks at the same time as it would have been more valuable to me, another lesson learned.  I had used the capabilities of my full copy of Adobe Acrobat to put footers on each page that include the page number.  Progress!  Now I had a reasonable starting point.  I started out with a simple Table of Contents in Excel showing the start and stop page, reporting mark, road name and total car count.  After a couple sessions, it became clear that I had an opportunity to expand the usefulness of this project if I included just a little more data.  Requirements creep had set in, but in a good way.  I resisted the urge to digitize ALL of the individual line entries as I had for the ATSF.  That would still have me doing a very long data entry task for marginal gain.  Being able to sort on cubic capacity or inside height can tell you a lot about similar cars on different lines, but. . . I’d rather know how many short box cars I need for my planned 600 car fleet.  I discovered a relatively fast way to do that.  I noticed in my first couple data entry sessions that many of the larger entries had recaps of the owner’s fleet broken down by car length for box and auto cars.  I changed my TOC to become more of a database of car types by road with what page I could find the entry on.  Killing two birds with one stone, I went back and added the info to my previous entries to complete the data set.  It took a bit longer, but I think the effort was worth while. 

I finished the data entry phase last month and had a grand total of 2,236,560 freight cars listed in the Jan 45 ORER give or take a couple hundred.  I tried to QC my entries and they are pretty good, but I know I had one that the recap and the page totals differed and I couldn’t figure out the correct number from the scanned images and didn’t want to manually add each line entry for 10,000 cars.  A couple percent on that one entry is way below the threshold of reasonable.  Nearly all of the other entries did up, most exactly, but a few were within 2-10 cars.  Again, I can live with that out of 2.2 Million.  Gee, that quote is three orders of magnitude higher than the worst known error.  There is one thing not accounted for and you will see an example of it in my selected cars:  not all private owners registered in every ORER edition.  The List of Reporting Marks has a dingbat that indicates which ones opted out of that edition.  TOCX, True’s Oil Company, wasn’t in the Private Owner listings on the CD.  It is in both of my hard copies that bracket the CD date, so I am confident that TOCX 10 was really plying the rails in Dec 44 despite it not having an entry in the Jan 45 edition.  The number of missing cars is likely to be small compared to the total, so I am not too worried about that as it comes to choosing the fleet.

So how does the Jan 45 fleet break down?  Of the 2.2 M cars, 2.05 M were in the US,

REPORT MARKS
BX
BH
BR
XM3
XM4
XM5
XA3
XA4
XA5
XA7
874
US TOTAL
1674
29
3703
57917
543007
13679
1642
75517
35951
1
944
ORER TOTAL
1674
29
4195
119727
602318
13679
1643
79768
35965
1












REPORT MARKS
V
S
G
F
H
T
R
L
B
LOG
874
US TOTAL
12729
57416
342920
58825
508100
154137
140607
12660
14958
14491
944
ORER TOTAL
12729
64789
357241
70393
516685
162484
146961
12671
18539
15069












REPORT MARKS
Tot Box
+ Auto
XM
XA
X&V






874
US TOTAL
729388
614603
113111
742117






944
ORER TOTAL
854775
735724
117377
867504


















REPORT MARKS
CARS

-H,LOG







874
US TOTAL
2049963

1529203







944
ORER TOTAL
2236560

1707204








The prototype fleet is humongous and the distribution of short box and auto cars is significant, more so than the 50 footers that Life Like/Walthers has over tempted me and my modeling budget.  Statistically non-existent was the 70 foot auto car, 1 in 2.23 million.  But if your city needed a LaFrance Ladder Truck, you were going to see that car, so it wasn’t as rare as the numbers make it out, but it was a special delivery like the Naval Rifles on the PRR or MILW gun flats.  ATSF interchanged traffic by barge directly to Mare Island, having handled 3,345 carloads via barge under contract with Crowley Launch & Tugboat Company between July 1940 and March 1944 (Baldwin 44-page 30).  That might not have been the route for the big gun, but the Port Chicago interchange with the SP could have gotten it there without an en-route sailing.  But those will be special movements, not common every ops session.  What will be common during ops sessions is steel, lots of it for the shipyards; petroleum products to and from the refineries; chemicals for Dow and the industries on the SP; merchandise cars, scads of them; auto parts for the war plants at Ford in Richmond and Chevy in Hayward via the SP in Oakland; not to mention boatloads of box cars of supply for the San Francisco Port of Embarkation and lots of vehicles in XAs or on flats & gons.  I figure that I will need an overage of the free running percentage for XAs and flats to account for the war traffic.  Maybe all those 50’ XAs are OK after all? 

So how have I set up my target fleet?  I started with the last numbers listed above and subtracted my home road cars from the totals without the hoppers or log cars.  I then divided my proposed fleet size into home road and foreign portions.  In my case, I used 1/3 and 2/3 based on the CSRM equipment survey document mentioned in the fourth post of this series and photos showing about that proportion in 1943.  I had previously set my Santa Fe cars modeled to 1/250 for all but XAs and FMs which are at 1/125 to account for the specialties needed above.  This gives me a slightly larger than 33% home road fleet, but with adjustments for cars less needed like reefers and stock cars, its still a 60/40 split even though the total has crept up a bit.

Mark
TOT
Name
XM3
XM4
XM5
XA3
XA4
XA5
XA7
V
S
G
F
H
T
R
L
B

685
GRAND TOTAL 
29
215
10
1
35
44
1
4
24
136
43
4
68
59
2
9

100%
INCL For @ 20%
4%
31%
1%
0%
5%
6%
0%
1%
4%
20%
6%
1%
10%
9%
0%
1%
39%
264
ATSF NBL CARS
10
73
6

15
22


16
45
22
4
14
30
2
5
60%
411
NON-ATSF US NBL
16
139
4
1
20
22
1
4
8
90
20

54
28
0
4
600 F FLT


















1/3 HOME
398
G-N NON-ATSF US
15
142
3
0
20
9
0
4
14
91
15

42
35
3
4
ATSF
206
G-N ATSF US
7
67
4
0
5
6
0
0
21
31
7
7
9
37
0
3

So how does that break out with the other railroads?  Even without the hoppers, Pennsy and NYC are the largest component.  Fewer reefers are used than the home road percentage of SFRD cars because other than Middle River, produce and fruit weren’t big originating commodities although produce arrived at Bay area canning plants from the central valley and LCL, magazines and other clean cargo cut down on empty miles for reefers returning to the West Coast. 

Mark
TOTAL
XM3
XM4
XM5
XA3
XA4
XA5
XA7
V
S
G
F
H
T
R
L
B
PRR
44

18


2
2
1

1
19
1





NYC
30
1
15
1

1
1



10
1





B&O
18

10


1
1



5
1





SP
16

7


1
1


1
2
2

1

0
1
UP
16

6
1

1
1


2
2
1

1


1
CB&Q
14
1
5


1
1


1
4
1





MILW
14

7


1
1


1
3
1





GATX
13












11
2


CNW
13

7


1
1


1
2
1





GN
12

6
1


1


1
1
1

1



IC
12

4
1

1
1



4
1





SR
12
4
3


1




3
1





L&N
11
2
2

1



1

4
1





MP
11
1
5


1
1



2
1





UTLX
11












11



RI
10

5


1
1



2
1





PFE
10













10


NP
9

5



1



1
1




1
ACL
7

1


2
1

1

1
1





C&O
6
1
2


1




2






N&W
6

2


1
1



2






ERIE
5
1
2



1



1






SBD
5

2





1

1
1





SLSF
5

3







1
1





WAB
5

2


2




1






FGEX
4













4


DRG&W
4

1



1



2






MDT
3













3


CG
3

1



1

1








DL&W
3
1
1







1






EJ&E
3









2
1





GTW
3
1



1
1










NKP
3

2







1






SHPX
3












3



SOO
3

2



1










WLE
3

1







2






ART
3













3


BM
2

1







1






CNJ
2

1







1






D&H
2
1








1






LV
2

1







1






NATX
2












2



NH
2
1
1














SDRX
2












2



T&P
2

1



1










WFEX
2













2


URTX
2













2


ARLX
1













1


NRC
1













1


A
1

1














AOX
1












1



BMX
1












1



C&EI
1









1






CGW
1

1














CIL
1









1






CONX
1












1



COSX
1












1



CSOX
1












1



DOWX
1












1



DUPX
1












1



EBAX
1












1



GM&O
1

1














GRCX
1












1



HHCX
1












1



LUX
1












1



M&StL
1

1














MEC
1

1














MKT
1

1














MPCX
1












1



MPLX
1












1



NC&StL
1
1















PSPX
1












1



SCCX
1












1



SLSF
1















1
SUNX
1












1



TOCX
1












1



UCR
1









1






UOCX
1












1



URR
1









1






USOX
1












1



USQX
1












1



VGN
1









1






WEOX
1












1



WM
1

1














WRNX
1












1



CPCX
0
















DPX
0
















DRX
0
















GCX
0
















ISTX
0
















KTX
0
















OZKX
0
















PTLX
0
















SCOX
0
















US SUB TOTAL
411
















CN
4
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
CP
4
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N de M
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
For Sub
9
3
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0


I need to validate the tank car numbers to account for Dow’s home point at their Pittsburg plant and cross check the UTLX proportion given the 50% share of the documented Port Chicago interchange traffic.  The Ethyl Corp’s EBAX cars also need to be represented on a frequent basis to carry antiknock compound to the refineries on the Carquinez strait making AVGAS for the war effort.  I can’t duplicate the image of a string of Phillips 66 tanks with a singleton either.  But those are for further research and future blog posts.

John Barry

Arlington VA